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Developing Adventures at New Park and Beyond

2 Nov

Feelings of adventure include confidence, doubt, curiosity and informed foresight.  Driven forward by this momentum, I drove to New Park to see what the fuss was all about.

Down the road from Taughanock Falls, this hidden gem of an estate lies behind a long wooden fence.  Arriving promptly for my appointment, Director of Operations, Martin Horn welcomed me warmly and began to describe the grounds.  My ability to speak left me as I observed the surroundings.  Magnificent details shine as part of a whole vision of vitality, excellence and comfort.  A custom glass rendition of the Finger Lakes inside a shower, elated me! Vintage telephones, a telephone booth and fluorescent lit jukebox also captured my attention.

Three sculptures of Jay Seaman accompany guests in an open outdoor area between buildings.

A copper musician plays the trombone in celebration and joy in the garden at New Park.

Jay Seaman’s sculpture appears to catch a ribbon unfurling.

Jay Seaman’s oxidized copper jester sculpture blends into the garden discreetly.

Created by Jamie Kehoe, New Park offers a unique, natural and luxurious venue to enjoy the Finger Lakes in numerous ways.

Event space at New Park Retreat

This welcoming space boasts cozy, woodland views while hosting guests gathering for celebrations, workshops and retreats.

A spectacular site for a destination wedding, New Park Corporate and Wellness Retreat can also meet needs of individuals and small groups.  More than a lodging facility, New Park provides a relaxing space to create memories through active means.  Try paddle boarding, indulge in a wine and cheese seminar amidst a woodland walk or learn about birds, water, African dance or butterflies! Sharing magic, through art, hospitality, education and celebration continues to guide activities at New Park.

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Monarch Eggs Have Arrived!

6 Sep

                         Monarch eggs arrive in the mail!

Monarch eggs arrived last week! A six gallon fish tank with a screen lid is an enormous habitat for the speck sized ovo from Rose Franklin of Butterfly Bushes in Pennsylvania.

I’ve been studying Monarch migration patterns and feeding needs for months, so I’ve been developing a deep appreciation for milkweed.  Milkweed serves as a food source and habitat for Monarchs.  There are many kinds of milkweed, some being more appealing to Monarchs than others.  (This area needs further investigation.)

Observing milkweed stances has become a bit of a hobby this summer.  Wether unwinding morning glory vines from milkweed plants or searching for Monarch eggs and caterpillars, I’m curious what I will find next.

Monarch caterpillar crawls around milkweed plant.

    Monarch caterpillar crawls upon milkweed in a hay field.

Learning about the multi generational migration of Monarchs makes me wonder where these ovo will fit into that cycle.  Their metamorphosis is estimated to be completed in 28-32 days.  Six days into their cycle they now look like super tiny black worms.

Monarchs are being released through various programs around the state.  Some of these programs are well established.  Read about the butterfly breeder who recently released nearly 150 Monarch butterflies !

Cornell’s Dyson School has an annual Monarch release that includes tagging the winged creatures! Professor Jack Little directed students in the proper technique of tagging, while many observed the butterflies release.  Follow this link to view pictures of the event.

Our Monarch eggs have changed into tiny worms and now small caterpillars!! New pictures soon!

Editor’s Note: Due to the severity of Harvey, publishing this post was delayed with respect for those affected by the disaster.  Grateful for pleasant weather in New York, we continue our work with concern and awareness for our shared existence.

We Love It, Therefore We Work For It

15 Jul Brown dog looks into Lake Ontario.
Sun shines upon the pretty blue waters of Lake Ontario

As foamy waves recede, rounded pebbles are revealed before the blue waters of Lake Ontario

 

The Community Room at The Wolcott Public Library filled up with citizens on July 11, 2016 for a showing of Lake Ontario: A Quest for Hope, by local resident, Susan Peterson Gately.  Ages ranged from six to seventy eight.

Residents gathered at The Wolcott Library July 11 to learn more about Lake Ontario

Residents gathered at The Wolcott Library in Wayne County, NY July 11 to watch and discuss “Lake Ontario: A Quest For Hope by Susan Peterson Gately

Audience members listened attentively as the film explained numerous aspects of Lake Ontario and its watershed that can surprise visitors and residents alike.  From shoreline dynamics and geology to living aquatic species to industrial pollution, the film offers a comprehensive view of this body of water.  Roughly forty people attended the film on a hot, July evening.

The dangers of microplastics were explained by Dr. Sherri Mason of SUNY Fredonia.  In the film she explains how plastics absorb chemicals in the water which are desorbed into creatures who consume them.  This means humans are consuming concentrations of chemicals that are stored within  the tissues of organisms.  So, not only do plastics become stuck inside species and their habitats, they also concentrate pollutants.

“What can we do?” was a question repeated by viewers.  Lifestyle choices were discussed including reusable shopping bags.  Reusable containers for drinks and food also save resources and reduce pollution.  Growing one’s own food reduces carbon emissions created during transportation and can also reduce chemicals used in the growing process.  Buying in bulk and using reusable containers can save money, reduce waste and it feels great! Small changes in one’s behavior do add up and can motivate and influence others too.  @PlasticFreeJuly is active on Twitter offering enthusiastic advice as people aim to reduce their reliance on plastic this July.  The Plastic Bank, (@SocialPlastic on Twitter) intends to use plastics reclaimed from the oceans and recycled into usable goods like these sunglasses.  Read more about this company who intends to clean oceans while empowering people in this June 8, 2016 Forbes article, “Social Plastic Makes Headway in Haiti.”

Beaches along this part of Lake Ontario are made of sand, clay and brightly colored pebbles of great variety

Beaches along this part of Lake Ontario are made of sand, clay and brightly colored pebbles of great variety

For those who enjoy scrambling upon beaches or viewing the shoreline from boats, there will be at least one event this summer when people can come together to clean beaches and test for plastics.  On August 20, 2016 volunteers in the Wolcott, NY area will take part in an effort occurring simultaneously on all Great Lakes with Mission eXXpedition.

Small Plastic Fills A Bag Quickly As It Is Extracted From a Favorite Fishing Access Site

Small Plastic Fills A Bag Quickly As It Is Extracted From a Favorite Fishing Access Site on Lake Ontario in upstate New York.

Paul Baines of the Great Lakes Commons was on hand to share the concept of “Commons.” Commons refers to things which offer value to others and which require care, like bodies of water or algebraic equations.  His group suggests that the Great Lakes be governed by the people who share the shores and waters for their mutual benefit.  Though a unique idea to many in attendance, The New York Times featured an article with a similar notion yesterday, July 13, 2016. Read the full article here: http://nyti.ms/29Hdomc

A short excerpt from the article reads: Chris Finlayson, New Zealand’s attorney general, said the issue was resolved by taking the Maori mind-set into account. “In their worldview, ‘I am the river and the river is me,’” he said. “Their geographic region is part and parcel of who they are.”

It was an honor to introduce Mr. Paul Baines to Lake Ontario from the rural shores of Wolcott, NY where the immensity of the lake impresses quietly.  Our aim is to connect people, to each other and to the lands where we work and play.  Please consider how your actions and choices affect the lake whose shores we live upon and join us in celebration of what can be done!

Brown Dog Trots Happily Upon Lake Ontario's Shore